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medal of honor, he was rising to the call of pearl har bob volunteering to serve his country. putting aside his dreams of being a physician. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his own soldiers. he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage to be elected to the senate. imagine he knew what it was like to break bar yes, sir and boundaries. when he came to the senate he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought to improve their lives. his style was one of absolute civilty. he believed the decorum of the senate enabled the senate to do the people's business. he was the essence of civilty and he showed that often goodmanners was good politics that led to good politics. he did not argue the loudest and instead he worked diligently. he mar shaled his arguments and with quiet determination won the day. and as a fell appropriate yate or the i saw that he loved his ear marks. and what did he do with those ear marks? i can tell you. he made sure that we looked out
friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young g.i. who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate and he's been a soft and powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate and in death he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha. and it is with a heavy heart that i and we bid aloha, goodbye, i love you to a friend and legend of the senate, daniel ken inouye. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend sincere condo lenses to senator inouye's -- condoences to senator inouye's family, colleagues, and constituents. in l
carney. c-span2 will be covering that live. and now bob woodward on his latest book "price of politics." he spoke with "politico's" chief white house correspondent mike allen and failing to chief a compromise. this is part of a "politico" playbook discussion. it's about 25 minutes. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to "playbook breakfast." thank you for coming out so early. we're excited to have an amazing double-header today. we are going to talk to senator rubio who last night gave a big speech, one of the first formal speeches looking ahead to the future of the republican party. we are going to talk to senator rubio about that. first we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations, is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in livestream land. we'll be taking your questions on #politicobreakfast. tweet us. welcome to c-span and to others. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions an
policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour half.fa i would direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and like all your thoughts, they need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to live, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those, and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, following up on this morning's session, in order that a balanced approach, w
or the other. all they're trying to do is protect their interests. host: bob is in barrington, illinois on our republican line. caller: on the matter of immigration, i live in illinois. illegals are not allowed in the .tate to have driver's licenses what is going on with our country? we have the most corrupt politicians in the united states in this state. everyone knows what is going on. they are selling our state out to the illegals and i am upset with it. if somebody breaks in my house, i'm not going to give them a bed and roof over their head. i'm going to put them in jail or kick him out of the country. host: bob, does the illinois state department of motor vehicles rulebook still say, must read, write, understand english? caller: no, i have not seen it in there. the should have kept that in there. i was in japan for four years. their rules are a lot tougher hours. we had to carry id's around. -- around 24/7. host: what kind of work did you do in barrington, illinois? caller: i worked all over. if i want to find a part-time job, it is hard. the minute they look at her white hair, they say
, i had the privilege of being with him. we stopped with bob dole as well. they were on a mountain top, literally as the crow flies, i think it was only two miles on the same day, both mortally wounded in fighting for their country. just above the bridges above custody. because of danny's sense of honor, that is the only thin i can ascribe it to. his loyalty first and foremost to his platoon, to the men he had sworn he would protect. he would do everything in his power to protect them. this is a man who kept fighting on that ridge even after his arm was severed. crying a grenade out of his severed arm and charging the next machine gun nest, taking it out in the process saving his men. he was awarded the medal of honor for incredible bravery. he did not do it because he was brave. he did it because he was loyal. he did it because of a sense of duty. he did it because this was his country. robert could have been talking about danny when he said -- when will the fis fear, when duty throws the gauntlet down to fete, when honor scorns to compromise with the death, that is heroism. in every
in the oregon massacre again at the hands of a gun and a perpetrator that is now dead and to say i thank bob costa for having the courage to get on national tv and speak to those who are rabid sports fans and say it's time for some form of gun regulation. the tragedy that occurred with the nfl player and his girlfriend speaks volumes to the idea of individuals who don't need to have guns in their hands. this phenomenon that guns don't kill, people do, is a trite and redundant and a ridiculous statement. we understand that guns have to have someone at their -- at their trigger, but the idea is with no regulations about those who had previous offenses, no regulations dealing with those who've had mental health issues, no regulations for the gun show loophole that you can go in and buy guns on top of guns, it is time to reflect and i think the sports committee could work with us to assure that america realizes there's nothing wrong withstanding up for gun regulation. let me offer sympathy to the brent and brown families to the nfl family and those concerned about athlete in pro ball, that we c
. that's the furthest thing from the truth. host: bob in silver spring, maryland, republican. caller: how are ya? i don't like it when the democrats all ask for gun restrictions in view of the tragedy. what about restrictions on the first amendment? do you want a balanced approach? should we restrict violent movies and video games by law? maybe in a movie, only three people can get shot, what do you think of that? guest: i am a former journalist. i have great respect for the first amendment and of the right to expression. we want to promote creativity and promote restrictit, so i would not advocate any legislative controls on content. -- we want to promote creativity, not to restrict it. we are talking about the need for parents to be responsible in what they allow their impressionable children to use or to seek. beyond that, i don't see we have much of our role. host: our last call comes from lamont in mansfield, ohio, a democrat. caller: how are you doing? i have more of a comment than a question. i think the problem with the guns does not act to do with legislation or mental check ups.
. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand. let me give my personal example. i live on $6.66 a day. that is food stamps. that is for single adults. i live on social security, $774 a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal stuff was not working correctly. what we have to do is c- span.org [indiscernible] i want to thank mr. richard delver of the department of transportation, because unlike michael bloomberg -- host: you have gone a
, martin, the chief staff to governor bob mcdonnell. at the end, roxanne white joining us from colorado. so, their full bios are in the pamphlet on your table. >> first, thank you for the report. it provides a good framework to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% in solvent. we did major reform and now we are in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs will go to 22%. to give you a sense of how far behind the war, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we have a right, we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. it is important to get through the litigation. we are very concerned about medicaid costs. they are about 20% of our budget, growing at a rate of 8% per year. we are very engaged in putting everyone in medicaid in an affordable care collaborative. we believe the exchange offers the opportunity for two things. it was largely supported by small businesses in colorado to help them to be able to afford insurance for their employees. there was a very bipart
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10